Case Study on B-school Life | Arthur Keller on Friday Night

 | September 14,2010 04:06 pm IST

It was Friday night during the last week of Period 2, and Arthur Keller, a student at INSEAD in Fontainebleau, France, was trying to study for the Marketing Management II exam he would have to take on Monday morning. Arthur was having a good time at INSEAD.

He enjoyed his studies and he had met some interesting people, but he felt like he was missing something.

He remembered the comments of his friend Baker, who had graduated from INSEAD in July 1998:
"Dude, INSEAD is a great place to meet girls. The parties are awesome, and there is always a lot of booze around. You go there, and you will have no problem with the ladies. Trust me."

At the time, Arthur was really excited by Baker's advice. But things hadn't really turned out as expected. Even worse, Arthur's mother had recently stepped up the pressure for him to settle down. He remembered how she had badgered him during their last telephone conversation:
 

"Arthur, you haven't brought any young women home in more than a year. Your father is worried about you. Remember our next-door neighbor Ludwig? He just got married last month - and he works in the post office! You know, you're not getting any younger."

Arthur wasn't sure what he wanted. Although he would not rule out a long-term commitment, he didn't know if he was ready to settle down. The only thing he was sure of was that something had to change.

Arthur's Background
Arthur was born in 1973 in a small town outside Frankfurt, Germany. After graduating from a boarding school in Hamburg, he studied Civil Engineering at the highly esteemed Deutschebayerischepoliteknikuniversität in Munich. He graduated in the top 10% of his class, but decided to leave engineering to work as a financial analyst for Deutsche Bank covering the Swedish women's apparel industry. He enjoyed his job, but after five years he was ready for a change.

Women had never expressed any strong opinions on Arthur's looks. He was 184 cm tall with a medium build. He liked to keep his light brown hair short, and a lot of people told him he looked a little like a young Sean Connery.
 

Arthur's first experience with a girl was at the age of 14, when he met Helga at a science camp. Helga was a year older than Arthur, and she had surprised him by asking if he wanted to go to "first base." Arthur wasn't very athletic, so he declined, but he regretted it for years to come.

One weekend when Arthur was home from university, his father walked into his room and sat down beside him. He could sense that his father was a little uncomfortable, so he asked if something was wrong. His father said that he had discussed the issue with Arthur's mother, and that they had decided it was time to talk to Arthur about "the birds and the bees." Although he had already learned most of his father's lessons on his own, he listened politely to the explanations.

During his last year at university, Arthur met a young Swiss girl named Heidi. She had been in his Art History class the previous year, but somehow he had never noticed her. But one night they were both studying late at the library and they got to talking. A few weeks later they started dating, and after a year together Arthur thought she might be "the one." But the stresses of living in different cities after graduation eventually became too intense, and Heidi decided it was time to move on.

Although people had warned him not to date his colleagues at Deutsche Bank, Linda from Human Resources was irresistible. Newly transferred from the London office, she had the cutest Scottish accent he had ever heard, as well as very impressive "highlands."

After three months, Linda decided to transfer back to the London office, and Arthur had to be satisfied with a string of "one-offs" from the Munich bar scene. Unhappy with this lifestyle, Arthur decided it was time to go back to school.

Business School Romance
There was widespread opinion that business school was where sex-crazed young professionals went when they wanted a break from work. In its November 1999 issue, Playboy magazine had even published a ranking of the "Best Business Schools To Get Lucky" (Exhibit 1). Receiving top honors was Northwestern University's Kellogg School, where more than 64% of students reported having sexual relations with one of their classmates.


Exhibit 1: Best Business Schools to Get Lucky


Source: Playboy Magazine, November 1999.

 

Recent trends in the job market had intensified the sexual nature of the MBA experience. One male student at the University of Virginia's Darden School reported that:

 

"After spending almost $100,000 and getting zero job offers, I figure I might as well get something out of this MBA. And let's face it: If these girls are gonna give it up for free, that's one hell of an NPV!"

 

Other students saw sex as an opportunity to improve their post-graduation prospects. According to one female student at Harvard Business School:

 

"Maybe there isn't a job waiting out there for me, but some of the guys here have some serious cash. If I can catch one of them while I'm here, then that's money in the bank."

 

The high level of sexual activity at business schools had led some outsiders to suggest that "MBA" really stands for "Married But Available." However, there was a romantic side to business school as well, with most classes generating at least one engagement by graduation.

 

Dating at INSEAD

INSEAD is an international business school in Fontainebleau, France. Although all classes are taught in English, students come from all over the world (Exhibit 2). Social interaction between students can take many forms. First, there are parties every weekend and even occasionally during the week. These parties may be organized by individual students, or they may be part of the National Weeks, in which students from a given country plan events for the rest of the school based on there customs and culture. Students also socialize in small groups, often by organizing "Random Dinners," during which they dine with randomly chosen classmates that they may never have met before.
 

 Exhibit 2: INSEAD September 2001 Promotion by Nationality

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Comments


poonam on 09/15/10 at 03:00 am

not satisfactory as a study


surendra on 10/07/10 at 09:51 am

i think study whether satisfactory or not does not make any differnce to the ideas and concepts people hv